Weight gain doesn't make you a diet failure

3 Steps to Making Peace With Weight Gain

Written by Ashley Seruya, B.A.

The intuitive eating process brings about a lot of change, some of which can be downright terrifying. Enter: weight gain.

It should be noted that weight gain is a possible side effect of making peace with food, but it isn’t necessarily inevitable. Some people lose weight on their intuitive eating journey, others maintain, and still others gain. Which camp you will eventually fall into is really anyone’s best guess, but making peace with weight gain – or any bodily changes – during this process is a huge part of body acceptance and truly embracing the intuitive eating model. This can be a really difficult process though due to the fatphobic world we live in, and some people avoid intuitive eating altogether just due to the FEAR of weight gain. It’s time to step in and assuage that fear… everyone deserves to seek out food peace, and making peace with weight gain can open that door. Ahead, my top three strategies:

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Nude Posture Photos and Self-Esteem

Did the Ivy League Nude Photo Scandal Affect Self-esteem & Body Image?

Part 1:
In doing some research on body image over several generations in my family, my 86- year-old mother mentioned an incident of which she had never spoken.

Imagine for a moment — Going off to your freshman year of college a little nervous — “Will you do well in your classes? Will you get along with your roommate? You then learn about a mandatory procedure for freshmen — a “posture study” where you’re photographed stark naked from the front, back and side.

Sounds ridiculous — but this really happened. My mother’s brief flashback started my research to verify if her mental faculties were still intact! There it was — a detailed and compelling article by Ron Rosenbaum in the New York Times Magazine Section, January 15, 1995: “The Great Ivy League Nude Posture Photo Scandal. “(1)

“One fall afternoon in the mid-60’s, shortly after I arrived in New Haven to begin my freshman year at Yale, I was summoned to that sooty Gothic shrine to muscular virtue known as Payne Whitney Gym. I reported to a windowless room on an upper floor, where men dressed in crisp white garments instructed me to remove all my clothes. And then — and this is the part I still have trouble believing — they attached metal pins to my spine. There was no actual piercing of skin, only of dignity, as four-inch metal pins were affixed with adhesive to my vertebrae at regular intervals from my neck down. I was positioned against a wall; a floodlight illuminated my pin-spiked profile and a camera captured it. The procedure did seem strange … But I soon learned that it was a long-established custom at most Ivy League and Seven Sisters schools … All of them — whole generations of the cultural elite — were asked to pose.” – Ron Rosenbaum

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Avoid the diet culture trap and start intuitive eating today

Intuitive Eating is Not Another Diet! 3 Things to Remember

Written by Ashley Seruya, B.A.

Are you noticing yourself placing diet rules and restrictions on your intuitive eating journey? Leave diets behind once and for all and avoid these 3 diet mentality traps.

For many of us, intuitive eating is something we come to when we finally give in and seek refuge from diet culture. We’ve likely been battered for so long, the rules and restrictions hammered into us for years on end, and we’ve seen it all fail miserably time and time again. Those of us who come to intuitive eating often do so with heads hung low, knowing we’ve finally hit our diet limit, and hoping beyond hope that maybe there’s another way; a way out.

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The gentle diet

Is Intuitive Eating like a “Gentle Diet?”

The “Gentle Diet” 

Recently, a client told me that she looked up the words, “gentle” and “diet.” to learn about Intuitive Eating.  I love that description, because intuitive eating is a gentle approach to improving health as we become the expert over our bodies and its many sensations. This means saying “goodbye” to strict diets as they promote: negative self-judgments, shaming, and “should” around food intake and body size. We must welcome compassionate self-care by:  honoring hunger, registering fullness cues, moving our bodies in a way that feels good, and finding new ways to comfort ourselves without food.

When people come to me with weight or food issues, my philosophy is to help them gently make changes that feel sustainable. Some people come because they have made a decision to change their lives, and they will do whatever it takes to make that happen. Others are sent by a loved one who wants them to lose weight, and they may be resistant to change.

The Gentle Diet

Pain, Suffering and Eating Disorders from Diet Mentality

I reject the whole notion of the strict diet mentality because I have seen the suffering and pain that it can cause – being a slave to the scale, judging oneself as “good” or “bad” depending on what you have eaten, and ultimately, disordered eating. I encourage people to eat in a way that feels good for their bodies and their self-esteem.

My concept is that a person needs to get away from the notion that she is “good” or “bad” based on calories or “forbidden” foods, and that there should be no rules or guilt associated with eating. I am not aware of any sin inherent in eating a donut. Are we more virtuous if we deny ourselves the pleasure of chocolate cake, and instead choose a piece of fruit when our taste buds surely would have preferred the chocolate?

For more information on Intuitive Eating, “The Gentle Diet,” and to download my e-book, “Three Steps to Get off the Diet Roller Coaster for Good:” CLICK THE LINK BELOW

Free Guide: Get off the Diet Roller Coaster for Good

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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